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Trick for Remote Support: How to Reboot a Win7 System When What You Are Doing Breaks the Network

I have to re-figure this out every time I need to do it, every few years, so I wrote this to remind me.

Once in a while, I have to change the IP address of a remote network. For instance, Comcast came into a customer of mine and replaced the modem/router. When they did, they put in their own local IP network number and broke the ability to get to any hard-coded IP addresses on the network (like printers). They used to be a 192.168.0.x network and now they were a 10.1.10.x network.

I could change all the hard coded devices to the new IP address scheme OR I could fix the network. It is a lot easier to change the one network than all the devices (on devices I can't easily reach because they are on another network, now, so I'd have to set up temporary IP routes and etc. etc. etc...).

The problem with changing the IP address on a router remotely is that you won't have access to the computer you remote in on after the change because it is still on the wrong network until a reboot.

So here's the simple trick to fix it all at once...

AVG Remote Admin Server Goes to 100% CPU

One of my client's AVG Remote Admin servers would go to 100% CPU usage and then refuse remote connections. Sometimes it would be temporary, but sometimes it would take a start/stop of the service to get things going again.

That would be OK, once a year or so, but this system started needed it every week.

While I haven't run a full week after what I did, I did come up with a way to start off with a clean database, which is what the problem was, I think...

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